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Dear FINE Members,

Research shows that children ages 0–8 spend an average of three hours a day engaging with various forms of media, including television, computers, mobile devices, and gaming consoles. Surprising, perhaps, is the finding that children under the age of 2 spend twice as much time watching television and videos as they do reading books, or being read to.1

How do parents make choices about the use of media to enhance young children’s development? Our FINE Newsletter takes a close look at parents’ views and practices around the use of digital media for learning. Based on the Joan Ganz Cooney Center’s new study, Learning at Home: Families’ Educational Media Use in America, Lori Takeuchi reports that parents are quite proactive in how they select educational media for their children. Nonetheless, parents seek guidance, and teachers, librarians, and others can point families to age-appropriate television shows, games, apps, and websites that have educational value.

Our Research Spotlight highlights research reports and articles about interesting trends: digital media offer opportunities for children’s learning anywhere, anytime; parents are more likely to consider the educational benefits rather than the downsides of technology for their children; and decisions about children’s media engagement should be informed by content, context, and the individual child.

We also compile resources related to family-school partnerships as well as family engagement policy in our Family Involvement News.

Join our efforts to explore digital media and learning—take our one-question web poll today!

With best wishes,
Harvard Family Research Project FINE Team


Voices From the Field

Q & A With Lori Takeuchi: Research Findings From Learning at Home: Families’ Educational Media Use in America

photo of Lori Takeuchi, Joan Ganz Cooney Center Research Director

These resources look at issues related to digital media and learning in early childhood and focus on such topics as children’s media use in the 21st century, family perspectives on children’s media use, and research-based guidance for practitioners and parents.


Research Spotlight 

Families and Digital Media in Young Children's Learning

Research Spotlight: Families and Digital Media in Young Children's Learning

These resources look at issues related to digital media and learning in early childhood and focus on such topics as children’s media use in the 21st century, family perspectives on children’s media use, and research-based guidance for practitioners and parents.


Family Involvement News

February 2014 News

Harvard Family Research Project's Family Engagement News

We are committed to keeping you up to date on family engagement news. The resources in this section highlight the latest tools and discussions from HFRP and review recent findings in the areas of family engagement policy as well as family-school partnerships.


Contact Us

As always, we invite your feedback on the topics we explore in this FINE Newsletter and encourage you to pass on this issue to interested friends and colleagues. Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter to join the conversation and stay informed!


1 Rideout, V. (2013). Zero to eight: Children's media use in America 2013. San Francisco, CA: Common Sense Media.
http://www.commonsensemedia.org/research/zero-to-eight-childrens-media-use-in-america-2013


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