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21st Century Community Learning Centers Program—Mobile Magnet After School Program

This afterschool program in Sumter County, South Carolina, is designed to increase academic achievement, self-esteem, and telecommunications and technology skills.

(Academic/Enrichment, Digital Media and Learning, Science/Technology/Mathematics)

Clemson University’s Youth Learning Institute and System Wide Solutions, Inc. (2005). Evaluation of the Mobile Magnet After-School Program In Sumter County School Districts 2 and 17 for the academic year 2004–2005. Columbia, SC: System Wide Solutions, Inc. www.swsolutionsinc.com/des/ed_4.html

4-H Robotics— Nebraska

This statewide initiative in Nebraska offers lessons to children ages 7–11 through after school 4-H clubs focused on teaching participants about robotics.

(Digital Media and Learning, Science/Technology/Mathematics)

Barker, B. & Ansorge, J. (2007). Robotics as means to increase achievement scores in an informal learning environment. Journal of Research on Technology Education, 39(3), 229–243.

Barker. S. B., Nugent, G., Grandgenett, N., & Hampton, A. (2008). Examining 4-H Robotics in the learning of science, engineering and technology topics and the related student attitudes. Journal of Youth Development, 2(3). data.memberclicks.com/site/nae4a/JYD_070203final.pdf

Barker. S. B., Grandgenett, N., Nugent, G., & Adamchuk, V. I. (2010). Robots, GPS/GIS, and programming technologies: The power of "digital manipulatives" in youth Extension experiences. Article Number 1FEA7. Journal of Extension, 48(1). www.joe.org/joe/2010february/a7.php

4-H/Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education After School Computer Lab Project

Begun in 1998, this project assists Missouri schools and other community organizations to develop computer-based after school programs for elementary through junior high school youth. The primary purpose is to create a supervised and supportive environment that encourages youth to play computer games that have positive educational content.

(Academic/Enrichment, Digital Media and Learning, Science/Technology/Mathematics)

Benesh, C., & Pabst, B. (2003). Playing to learn: An evaluation of the participation of upper elementary and middle school students in Missouri recreational computer lab programs. Columbia: University of Missouri Columbia Outreach & Extension.

Henness, S., & Brown, S. J. (2004). Brightening horizons: The impact of after school programs on children's computer skills. Columbia, MO: University of Missouri Columbia Outreach & Extension.
mo4h.missouri.edu/programs/computer/

Appalachian Regional Commission Oak Ridge National Laboratory Summer Institute for Math/Science/Technology

In operation since 1990, this summer program provides high school students and teachers from the Appalachian region the opportunity to work with mentor scientists on inquiry-based, applied projects in science, math, and computer technology.

(Digital Media and Learning, Science/Technology/Mathematics)

Simkin, L. S., & Futch, V. (2006). Evaluation of the Appalachian Regional Commission Oak Ridge National Laboratory Summer Institute for Math/Science/Technology. Washington DC: Appalachian Regional Commission. scs.aed.org/publications/arc_ornl.pdf
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Ascend Summer Youth Program

This program for teens in Washington, DC, provides mentoring, workforce readiness awareness, and project-based learning experiences using information technology to address a variety of social, affective, cognitive, and academic outcomes necessary for postsecondary success.

(Digital Media and Learning, Science/Technology/Mathematics, Vocational Education)

Nielsen, N. (2005). Evaluation of the Ascend Summer Youth Program 2005: Summative report. Washington, DC: Ascend, Inc. policyweb.sri.com/cep/projects/displayProject.jsp?Nick=easyp

Boys & Girls Clubs of America—Broward County Youth Educational Success (YES) After-School Program

Initiated in 2000 in Broward County, Florida, this academic after school program for at-risk students of all ages was implemented in five Boys and Girls Clubs. YES uses computer-assisted instruction with small group instructor-led activities to optimize learning in a collegial environment.

(Digital Media and Learning)

Brown, A. (2002). The Boys and Girls Club of Broward County After-School Program evaluation report. Broward County, FL: The School Board of Broward County's Office of Research and Evaluation.

Brown, A. (2004). The Boys and Girls Club of Broward County (BGC) After-School Program evaluation report 2002–03. Broward, FL: The School Board of Broward County, Florida.

Brown, A. (2006). The Boys and Girls Club of Broward County After-School Program evaluation report, 2004–05. Broward County, FL: The School Board of Broward County's Office of Research and Evaluation.
www.broward.k12.fl.us/research_evaluation/Evaluations.htm>

Boys & Girls Clubs of America—Club Tech

This international digital literacy program aims to help youth build digital skills, access technology resources, expand creativity, perform better in school, and eventually take their technology know-how into the workplace.

(Digital Media and Learning, Vocational Education)

Rockman et al & Youth Development Strategies, Inc. (2009). Learning technologies in after school settings: Impact of technology programming and access in Boys & Girls Clubs. San Francisco: Author.

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Boys & Girls Clubs of America—Project Connect

Initiated in 1999 in a small number of Boys & Girls Clubs across the country, this pilot program was designed to test the feasibility of installing computer centers in clubs nationwide. These Clubs provided enhanced access to technology, educational software, and the Internet.

(Digital Media and Learning, Science/Technology/Mathematics, System-Building)

Henriquez, A., & Ba, H. (2000). Project Connect: Bridging the digital divideFinal evaluation report. New York: EDC Center for Children & Technology. www2.edc.org/CCT/admin/publications/report/pc_bdd00.pdf

Buhl Middle School After School Math Help Class

Starting in 2003, this program in Buhl, Idaho, provides computer-assisted remedial math classes after school to middle school students who voluntarily attend.

(Digital Media and Learning, Science/Technology/Mathematics, Tutoring/Extra Instruction)

McDonald, N. Trautman, T., & Blick, L. (2005). Computer-assisted middle school mathematics remediation intervention: An outcome study. Oklahoma City, OK: American Education Corporation. www.amered.com/research_2.php

Build IT

Funded to operate 2005 through 2008 in Alameda County, California, this afterschool and summer curriculum aims to develop low-income middle school girls’ information technology (IT) fluency, interest in math, and knowledge of IT careers.

(Digital Media and Learning, Science/Technology/Mathematics, Vocational Education)

Koch, M. (2006). Build IT: Girls developing information technology fluency through design annual report. Menlo Park, CA: SRI International. ctl.sri.com/publications/downloads/Y1BuildITAnnualReport_2006FIN.pdf

Koch, M., Georges, A., Gorges, T., & Fujii, R. (2010). Engaging youth with STEM professionals in afterschool programs. Meridian Middle School Computer Technologies Journal, 13(1). www.ncsu.edu/meridian/winter2010/index.html

Community Access to Technology Program

Since 1999, the Community Access to Technology (CAT) program has made grants to a wide variety of Washington State nonprofits that improve clients’ lives by providing access to and hands-on training in technology. To evaluate the collective impact of programs sponsored by the CAT program, a multiyear study was conducted of out-of-school time programs that use technology as a learning tool for low-income youth in Washington state.

(Digital Media and Learning, Science/Technology/Mathematics)

MGS Consulting. (2008). Community Access to Technology Program: Evaluation report—Year 3. Seattle, WA: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

MacCarthy, M., & Hanson, K. (2009). Out-of-school technology programs: Creating brighter futures for youth. Journal of Youth Development, 4(2). http://data.memberclicks.com/site/nae4a/JYD_090402final.pdf

CompuGirls

This culturally relevant technology program serves adolescent (grades 8–12) girls from under-resourced school districts in the Greater Phoenix area. The program provides summer and afterschool classes where participants learn the latest technologies in digital media, games, and virtual worlds, and become a voice for social justice and change in the world.

(Digital Media and Learning, Positive Youth Development)

CompuGirls. (2011). CompuGirls program evaluation 2009–2010. Tempe: Arizona State University.

Digital WAVE

This year-long program is offered by the Miami Science Museum to enable high school students to learn more about climate science, digital technologies, and related careers.

(Digital Media and Learning, Science/Technology/Mathematics)

Tyner, K. (2010). Results of the Digital WAVE Summer Design Studio evaluation: Cohort 2. Miami, FL: Miami Science Museum. www.miamisci.org/www/evals_reports/Digital_WAVE_Cohort_2_Evaluation.pdf

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Discovery Youth

Initiated in 2001, this after school program gives 10- to 14-year-olds in San Jose, California, the chance to develop multimedia projects that promote healthy behaviors to other audiences, especially younger peers.

(Digital Media and Learning, Science/Technology/Mathematics, Service-Learning/Civic Engagement)

Gilbert, D. (2002). Looking back and looking ahead: A formative evaluation of Discovery Youth at San Jose Children's Discovery Museum. San Jose, CA: San Jose Children's Discovery Museum.

Moghadam, S. H. (2004). An evaluation of the San Jose Children's Discovery Museum after school and weekend program. Oakland, CA: ASSESS.

www.cdm.org/p/viewPage.asp?mlid=159

Durham North Carolina After-School Programs

These programs provide before- and afterschool care at all elementary sites in Durham Public Schools. All school-age care sites meet the certification standards of the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction and operate under the accreditation guidelines established by the National AfterSchool Association.

(Academic/Enrichment, Digital Media and Learning)

Johnson, J. L., & Hall, M. (2007). Effectiveness of after-school programs. Durham, NC: Durham Public Schools.

Elementary Institute of Science—San Diego

This science enrichment center in San Diego County, California, offers science and technology programs to students ages 7–15 through after school, Saturday, and summer programs.

(Digital Media and Learning, Science/Technology/Mathematics)

Quintanilla, G., & Packard, T. (2002). A participatory evaluation of an inner-city science enrichment program. Evaluation and Program Planning, 25(1), 15–22. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0149-7189(01)00045-3

FIRST® LEGO® League

In this international robotics program, teams of youth aged 9–14 build LEGO-based robots and develop research projects. Through this program, participants strategize, design, build, program, and test robots; create innovative solutions for challenges facing today’s scientists; apply real-world math and science concepts; develop employment and life skills; become involved in their community; participate in official tournaments and local events; qualify for an invitation to World Festival; and engage in team activities. A "Junior" version of the program serves children aged 6–9.

(Digital Media and Learning, Science/Technology/Mathematics)

Center for Youth and Communities. (2005). Junior FIRST LEGO League survey: Evaluation report. Waltham, MA: Brandeis University.

Melchior, A., Cutter, T., & Cohen, F. (2005). Evaluation of FIRST® LEGO® League Underserved Initiative. Waltham, MA: Center for Youth and Communities, Brandeis University.

Melchior, A. L., Cutter, T., & Deshpande, A. (2009). Evaluation of the FIRST LEGO League, "Climate Connections" season (2008–2009). Waltham, MA: Center for Youth and Communities, Brandeis University.

www.usfirst.org/aboutus/content.aspx?id=46

FIRST® Robotics Competition

This national robotics program is designed to build awareness and interest in science and engineering among youth in grades 9–12 through building robots and entering them in competitions. Under strict rules, limited resources, and time limits, teams of 25 youth or more are challenged to raise funds, design a team "brand," hone teamwork skills, and build and program robots to perform prescribed tasks against a field of competitors.

(Digital Media and Learning, Science/Technology/Mathematics)

Melchior, A. L., Cutter, T., & Cohen, F. (2005). More than robots: An evaluation of the FIRST Robotics Competition: Participant and institutional impacts. Waltham, MA: Center for Youth and Communities, Brandeis University.

Cutter, T., Cohen, F., & Melchior, A. (2006). Evaluation of FIRST Robotics Competition Underserved Initiative. Waltham, MA: Center for Youth and Communities, Brandeis University.

Melchior, A. (2009). Michigan FIRST Robotics Competition district tournament pilot evaluation summary. Waltham, MA: Center for Youth and Communities, Brandeis University.

www.usfirst.org/aboutus/content.aspx?id=46

FIRST® Tech Challenge

In this national program, teams of up to 10 youth in grades 9–12 design, build, and program robots to compete against other teams. Awards are given for the competition as for well as for community outreach, design, and other real-world accomplishments. In this program, participants apply real-world math and science concepts; develop problem-solving, organizational, and team-building skills; compete and cooperate in alliances and tournaments; earn a place in the World Championship; and qualify for college scholarships.

(Digital Media and Learning, Science/Technology/Mathematics)

Center for Youth and Communities. (2006). FIRST Vex Challenge evaluation summary. Waltham, MA: Brandeis University. www.usfirst.org/aboutus/content.aspx?id=46

Girl Game Company

This afterschool and summer program serves middle school girls in a rural part of central California. The goals are to increase girls’ information technology fluency through computer-based activities, and to build peer, family, and other adult support to enhance girls’ interest in and capacity to pursue and persist in computer courses and careers.

(Digital Media and Learning, Science/Technology/Mathematics)

Denner, J., Bean, S., & Martinez, J. (2009). The Girl Game Company: Engaging Latina girls in information technology. Afterschool Matters, 8, 26–35. www.robertbownefoundation.org/pdf_files/2009_asm_spring.pdf
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Girls Creating Games Program

This afterschool program in Capitola, California, aims to build middle school girls’ interest, skills, fluency, and confidence in information technology.

(Digital Media and Learning, Science/Technology/Mathematics)

Denner, J. (2007). The Girls Creating Games Program: An innovative approach to integrating technology into middle school. Meridian: A Middle School Computer Technologies Journal, 1(10). www.ncsu.edu/meridian/win2007/girlgaming/index.htm

Girls Inc.—Operation Smart

Begun in the mid 1980s, this national program develops girls’ enthusiasm for and skills in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Through hands-on activities, girls explore, ask questions, persist, and solve problems. By interacting with women and men pursuing STEM careers, girls come to view these careers as exciting and realistic options for themselves.

(Digital Media and Learning, Science/Technology/Mathematics, Vocational Education)

Girls Incorporated National Resource Center. (2001). Operation SMART evaluation summary. Indianapolis, IN: Author.

Girls Math and Technology Program

Initiated in 1998, this residential summer camp in northern Nevada is designed to impact middle school girls' attitudes about and perceived abilities in mathematics and technology.

(Digital Media and Learning, Positive Youth Development, Science/Technology/Mathematics)

Wiest, L. (2003). The impact of a summer mathematics and technology program for middle school girls. Reno, NV: Author.

DeHaven, M. A., & Wiest, L. R. (2003). Impact of a girls' mathematics and technology program on middle school girls' attitudes toward mathematics. The Mathematics Educator, 13, 32–37.

InfoLink

In operation from 1994 to 2002 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, this intensive summer program provided low-income high school students with information technology and professional development skills, experience, and confidence to improve their long-term educational and occupational attainment.

(Digital Media and Learning, Science/Technology/Mathematics, Vocational Education)

Nelson, C. A., Post, J., & Bickel, B. (2002). InfoLink final evaluation report: Building confidence and aspirations in low income high school students through a technology and workforce skills development program: Lessons learned from the InfoLink experience, 1994–2002. Pittsburgh, PA: University of Pittsburgh. itclass.heinz.cmu.edu/infolink2003/InfoLink03/docs/Lessons_Learned.pdf

Intel Computer Clubhouse Network

Begun in 2000, this national program encourages young people to use technology-rich environments to construct artifacts, explore ideas, and creatively express themselves, in collaboration with peers and local mentors.

(Digital Media and Learning, Mentoring, Science/Technology/Mathematics)

Pryor, T., Culp, K. M., Lutz, S., & John, K. (2001). Evaluation of the Intel Computer Clubhouse Network, year 1. New York: Center for Children and Technology, Education Development Center.

Lavine, M., & Hochman, J. (2002). Evaluation of the Intel Computer Clubhouse, year two report. New York: Center for Children and Technology, Education Development Center. 

Internet Community of Design Engineers Program

This 3-year program (2006–2009) offered after school and summer sessions to middle and high school students in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The goal was to increase the likelihood that participants would pursue Information Technology (IT) and Science-Technology-Engineering-Math careers, by engaging them in intensive, hands-on IT learning experiences.

(Digital Media and Learning, Science/Technology/Mathematics)

Londhe, R. (2009). Internet Community of Design Engineers (iCODE) final evaluation report. Cambridge: MA: Goodman Research Group. www.informalscience.org/reports/0000/0222/GRG_s_Final_Report_with_appendices.pdf

JCPenney/Junior Achievement Afterschool Partnerships

This pilot program was implemented in the greater St. Louis, Missouri, area in 2003. The pilot promoted programs focusing on business, finance, and the Internet at Boys and Girls Clubs and YMCAs in an effort to increase implementation of these programs in after school settings across St. Louis and surrounding counties.

(Digital Media and Learning, Positive Youth Development, Science/Technology/Mathematics)

Breinig, J. & Frankel, P. (2004). Analysis of survey results from the JCPenney–St. Louis/Junior Achievement After-School Program Partnership. Colorado Springs, CO: Junior Achievement. www.ja.org/programs/programs_eval_afterschool.shtml

Jobs for Youth—Boston PLATO Summer Transition Program

This program, initiated in 2000, provides ninth grade students in Boston, Massachusetts, who failed the citywide public schools’ math or reading test with supplemental instruction using specially designed computer instruction software called PLATO.

(Digital Media and Learning, Science/Technology/Mathematics, Tutoring/Extra Instruction)

Quinn, D. W., & Quinn, N. W. (2001). PLATO learning evaluation series: Jobs for Youth, Madison Park Alternative High School, Boston, Massachusetts. Bloomington, MN: PLATO Learning. www.plato.com/media/Evaluation%20Studies/M/Madison%
20Park%20High%20School%20(Jobs%20for%20Youth).pdf

Kids Learning in Computer Klubhouses (KLICK)

Begun in 1999, this consortium of 10 middle school after school computer clubhouses across Michigan provides safe and engaging learning opportunities to students during the out-of-school hours.

(Academic/Enrichment, Digital Media and Learning, Science/Technology/Mathematics)

Zhao, Y., Mishra, P., & Girod, M. (2000). A clubhouse is a clubhouse is a clubhouse. Computers in Human Behavior. 16(3), 287–300. citeseer.ist.psu.edu/cache/papers/cs/13618/http:zSzzSzpunya.educ.msu.
eduzSzpubszSzprintzSzclubhouse.pdf/a-clubhouse-is-a.pdf


Garner, R., & Zhao, Y. (2000). Afterschool centers in four rural communities in Michigan. Computers in Human Behavior. 16(3), 301–311.

Kitty Andersen Youth Science Center Programs

These programs engage youth in grades 7–12 in science activities after school, on Saturdays, and during the summer in St. Paul and Minneapolis, Minnesota. Youth build competencies in leadership, career development, and science literacy through developing community service learning projects and leading workshops/outreaches for younger youth.

(Digital Media and Learning, Science/Technology/Mathematics, Youth Leadership)

Nelson, A. G., Cohn, S., Philippe, C., & Svarovsky, G. N. (2008). Big Back Yard Park Crew summative evaluation. St. Paul: Science Museum of Minnesota Department of Evaluation and Research in Learning. http://informalscience.org/evaluation/show/337

Nelson, A. G., Fitzenberger, M., Miller, K., & Philippe, C. (2009). KAYSC IDEA Cooperative: Year 2 formative evaluation. St. Paul: Science Museum of Minnesota Department of Evaluation and Research in Learning. http://informalscience.org/evaluation/show/345

Nelson, A. G., & Ostgaard, G. (2010). KAYSC Podcast Crew: Evaluation activities 2009–2010. St. Paul: Science Museum of Minnesota Department of Evaluation and Research in Learning. http://informalscience.org/evaluation/show/332

Nelson, A. G., & Ostgaard, G. (2011). IDEA Cooperative: Select findings from the Invention Crew exit survey. St. Paul: Science Museum of Minnesota Department of Evaluation and Research in Learning. http://informalscience.org/evaluation/show/339

Nelson, A. G., & Ostgaard, G. (2011). IDEA Cooperative: Select findings from the Design Team exit survey. St. Paul: Science Museum of Minnesota. http://informalscience.org/evaluation/show/338

Let's Go STEM—Y of Central Maryland

This curriculum is used by the YMCA of Central Maryland to introduce youth participants to STEM through robotics. The goal is to instill in youth the love of math and science, and the critical thinking necessary to spark a lifelong interest and career in these disciplines.

(Digital Media and Learning, Science/Technology/Mathematics)

Domingo, M. R. (2010). Y of Central Maryland Let's Go STEM Program fall 2010 evaluation report. Pasadena, MD: Y of Central Maryland.

Martin Luther King, Jr. After-School Program

This after school technology project in Dorchester, Massachusetts, for middle and high school students uses the Encarta Africana (an encyclopedia of Africa and its diaspora) as the core of the curriculum. The goal of the program is to teach technology skills through the study of Afrocentric topics.

(Culture/Heritage, Digital Media and Learning, Science/Technology/Mathematics)

Goldsmith, L. & Sherman, A. (2002). Evaluation of the pilot year of the Martin Luther King, Jr. After-School Program. Newton, MA: Education Development Center.

Matzko, M. (2002). An evaluation study of the Martin Luther King, Jr. After-School Program. Somerville, MA: Brett Consulting Group.

Migrant Educational Technology Program

This after school program in Detroit, Michigan, teaches Latino migrant families basic computing and educational software applications to help them support their children's schoolwork more effectively.

(Digital Media and Learning, Family/Community Involvement, Science/Technology/Mathematics)

Carrillo, R. (2004). Making connections: Building family literacy through technology. In Scholars in the field: Challenges in migrant education, Cinthia Salinas & María E. Fránquiz (Eds.). Charleston, WV: ERIC Clearinghouse on Rural Education and Small Schools.

Minority Pre-Engineering Mentor Program

This summer program in Wichita, Kansas, involves high school juniors in science, math, and engineering workshops and offers tutorials in note taking, calculator use, and computer usage and programming, as well as a job shadowing internship at the Boeing Military Airplane Company. The program is designed to increase minority participation in math, science, and engineering.

(Digital Media and Learning, Mentoring, Science/Technology/Mathematics, Vocational Education)

Dunn, C. W., & Veltman, G. C. (1989). Addressing the restrictive career maturity patterns of minority youth: A program evaluation. Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development, 17, 156–165.

MOUSE Squad

This program is a school- or community organization-based, student run technical help desk. The program provides middle and high school students with opportunities to develop 21st century skills and apply them as they solve technical problems faced by their schools. Currently, the program operates in New York City, California, and Illinois.

(Digital Media and Learning, Science/Technology/Mathematics, Vocational Education)

Aaronson, B., Androsiglio, R., Beam, J., Forge, N., Mello, V., Smith, C., & Zusho A. (2007). MOUSE Squad Program implementation and outcomes. New York: National Center for Schools and Communities, Fordham University. www.ncscatfordham.org/binarydata/files/FINALMOUSE.pdf
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NYC FIRST! (New York City For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology)

Implemented in 1998, this program in New York City is typically run as either an after school or weekend program. FIRST is a national organization that engages middle and high school students, working with adult coaches and mentors, in researching, designing, and building robots and participating in games of skill and strategy meant to transfer the enthusiasm youth feel for athletics to the fields of math, science, and engineering. 

(Digital Media and Learning, Science/Technology/Mathematics)

Jeffers, L. (2003). Evaluation of NYC FIRST! New York: EDC Center for Children and Technology. cct.edc.org/report.asp?id=141

Photonics Leaders

Begun in 2005 at North Carolina State University, this program seeks to enhance access to science classes and careers for all students, especially minority students, by giving them opportunities to participate in real scientific investigations making use of a variety of technological tools. The curriculum includes weekday and Saturday activities during the school year and summer activities.

(Digital Media and Learning, Science/Technology/Mathematics)

Hall, M., Campbell, B., & Johnson, J. (2007). Evaluation of Photonics Leaders. Raleigh: North Carolina State University.

PowerUP

Founded in 1999, this program's mission is to ensure that America's underserved youth acquire the skills, experiences, and resources to succeed in the digital age. PowerUP provides technology, funding, training, and technical assistance to local PowerUP centers, which foster positive development among youth during after school, evening, and weekend hours.

(Digital Media and Learning, Positive Youth Development, Science/Technology/Mathematics)

Vesneski, W., Skinner, N., & Schneider, L. (2002). PowerUP evaluation report. Seattle, WA: The Evaluate Group.

Project SOAR (Super Opportunities With After-School Resources)

Programs provided intensive academic assistance, telecommunications and computer technology training, mentors, recreational and enrichment activities, health and nutrition programs, and expanded media center hours for K–12 students in Wake County, North Carolina.

(Digital Media and Learning, Mentoring, Multi-Component/Comprehensive)

EDSTAR. (2001). Wake County Public School System Project SOAR evaluation report for school year 2000–2001. Raleigh-Durham, NC: Author.

Johnson, J., Hall, M., Van Vleck, P., & Peach, J. (2004). SOAR: Super Opportunities With After-School Resources Wake County Public Schools 2000–2004. Raleigh, NC: EDSTAR.

Johnson, J. L., Hall, M., Van Vleck, P., Peach, J. S., & Lewis, R. G. (2007). Effectiveness and successful program elements of SOAR's afterschool programs. Journal of Youth Development, 1(3).

Service at the Salado

This after school program, implemented at four schools in Phoenix, Arizona, in 2003, engages students in grades 5–8 in learning about and serving their community through scientific inquiry and technology and by creating projects that are exhibited to the public at a local park.

(Digital Media and Learning, Science/Technology/Mathematics, Service-Learning/Civic Engagement)

Saltz, C., Crocker, N., & Banks, D. L. (2004). Evaluation of Service at the Salado for Fall 2004. Tempe, AZ: Arizona State University International Institute for Sustainability. 

South Bay Project

This collaboration of school and community institutions provides K–12 students in low-performing schools in San Diego, California, with computer-integrated activities after school. The program provides computer-mediated activities combining play with academically rigorous learning in a low-surveillance, collaborative learning environment.

(Academic/Enrichment, Digital Media and Learning, Science/Technology/Mathematics)

Tripp, L. M. (2002). Trying to bend the bars of the iron cage: A case study of a K–12 partnership. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of California, San Diego.
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STUDIO 3D

Initiated in 2000, this Minnesota-based afterschool outreach program provides youth—aged 10–18 and now living in low-income, inner-city neighborhoods in Minneapolis and St. Paul—with access to equipment, software, and adult mentors to support them in learning and applying advanced digital design technologies.

(Digital Media and Learning, Mentoring, Science/Technology/Mathematics)

Volkov, B. B., & King, J. A. (2003). Report of STUDIO 3D project evaluation. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, Department of Educational Policy and Administration, Evaluation Studies Program. www.smm.org/studio3d/mission.html

Summer Science Academy

Initiated in 1996, this program offers high school students in Rochester, New York a challenging, intensive 2 to 4 week summer program consisting of independent lab projects, bioethics discussion sessions, a biocomputing course, scientist seminars, and field trips.

(Digital Media and Learning, Science/Technology/Mathematics)

Markowitz, D. G. (2004). Evaluation of the long-term impact of a university high school summer science program on students’ interest and perceived abilities in science. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 13, 395–407.

TechBridge

This afterschool program in Oakland, California, aims to inspire girls in grades 5–12 to discover a passion for technology, science, and engineering through hands-on activities, role models, and worksite visits.

(Digital Media and Learning, Science/Technology/Mathematics)

TechBridge. (2010). TechBridge annual report: Changing lives, one girl at a time. Oakland, CA: Author.

TECHie Club

This program is designed to introduce elementary students in Ohio to technology and all of its possibilities. The program includes hands-on interactive activities tied directly to national technology standards for students in grades 3–5, and focuses on the fundamentals of computer programming, robotics, web development, and digital media.

(Digital Media and Learning, Science/Technology/Mathematics)

TechCorps. (2010). TECHie Club overview and evaluation summary FY 2009–2010. Columbus, OH: Author. http://techcorps.org/files/2009-2010%20TECHie%20Club%20Evaluation%20Summary.pdf

Technology-Rich Virtual Community After School Class

This program, implemented in 2001, creates technology-rich activities and experiences for an after school class in science and technology for middle school girls from a low socio-economic urban neighborhood. The program was designed to create a virtual community of practice whose members used science in diverse ways.

(Digital Media and Learning, Science/Technology/Mathematics)

Edwards, L. D. (2002). Creating a virtual community of practice to investigate legitimate peripheral participation by African American middle school girls in science activities. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Colorado, Boulder.

TechREACH

Launched in 2003, this afterschool program targets low-income, at-risk middle school girls in western Washington State and engages them in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology (STEM) activities to increase their interest in STEM with high-quality curricula and real world projects.

(Digital Media and Learning, Science/Technology/Mathematics)

Molloy, P. & Aronson, J. (2004). TechREACH: Year 1 evaluation report. Bothell, WA: Puget Sound Center for Teaching.

Molloy, P. & Aronson, J. (2005). TechREACH: Year 2 evaluation report. Bothell, WA: Puget Sound Center for Teaching.

www.techreachclubs.org/programs/evaluations.html

Tronix Team Afterschool Program

Begun in 1997, this after school science program offers middle and high school students in Minneapolis, Minnesota, a chance to learn about science and engineering through hands-on building projects and technology workshops. The primary target audience is minority youth in disadvantaged neighborhoods and high poverty schools.

(Digital Media and Learning, Science/Technology/Mathematics)

Hardeman, R., Gaona, M., & Meyerson, J. (2008). Evaluation of the Tronix Team Afterschool Program. St. Paul, MN: Wilder Research. www.wilder.org/reportsummary.0.html?&no_cache=1&tx_ttnews[pointer]=2&tx_ttnews[tt_news]=2110&tx_ttnews[backPid]=111&cHash=af6e5d699c

Youth Radio

This program engages underserved youth in broadcast journalism, radio and web production, engineering, and media literacy through media projects that are relevant to youth’s lives and communities. It also provides an externship program that offers youth job shadowing and mentoring in media, technology, and social justice institutions. The program’s main campus is in Oakland, California, with regional bureaus in Atlanta, Georgia, Washington, DC, and Los Angeles, California.

(Digital Media and Learning, Science/Technology/Mathematics, Vocational Education)

Bandy, E., & Bass, K. with Kuusinen, C., Scott, B., & Reisman, M. (2009). Youth Radio science and technology program evaluation. San Francisco: Rockman et al. www.informalscience.org/reports/0000/0217/Youth_Radio_Final_Eval_Report_v2.pdf
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