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21st Century After Hours Program

Initially funded in 1999, this program provides expanded learning and enrichment opportunities outside the regular school hours for children and adults in junior high and elementary schools in Fort Collins, Colorado.

(Academic/Enrichment, Family/Community Involvement)

Albright, L. (2002). Evaluation of the 21st Century After Hours Program: Poudre school district. Fort Collins, CO: Research and Development Center for the Advancement of Student Learning.

21st Century Community Learning Centers Program—Boys & Girls Clubs of Chicago

Implemented in 2003 in six public schools in Chicago, Illinois, this comprehensive youth development program provides challenging and engaging academic afterschool programming, parent services/instruction, and staff development.

(Academic/Enrichment, Family/Community Involvement, Positive Youth Development)

Center for Prevention Research & Development. (2004). Boys & Girls Clubs of Chicago: The implementation of the 21st Century Community Learning Centers Program: First year evaluation report. Chicago, IL: University of Illinois Institute of Government and Public Affairs.

Center for Prevention Research & Development. (2005). Boys & Girls Clubs of Chicago: The implementation of the 21st Century Community Learning Centers Program: Second year evaluation report. Chicago, IL: University of Illinois Institute of Government and Public Affairs.

21st Century Community Learning Centers—Bryan, Texas

This program for elementary and middle school youth began in 2004 in Bryan, Texas, and provides afterschool and summer programming to disadvantaged youth, including tutorial and academic enrichment, parent literacy, computer technology, and enrichment activities.

(Academic/Enrichment, Family/Community Involvement, Positive Youth Development)

Witt, P. (2005). First year evaluation: Bryan ISD 21st Century Community Learning Centers Program. College Station, TX: Author.
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21st Century Community Learning Centers—Chinatown/YMCA of Greater New York

This program includes an afterschool program, leadership clubs, and homework assistance for middle school students at risk of school failure, in addition to a family program designed to increase parent and family capacity for involvement.

(Academic/Enrichment, Family/Community Involvement)

Bennett, E. T. (2004). Family involvement and school performance in the Chinatown YMCA 21st Century Community Learning Center (Unpublished master's thesis). Fordham University, New York.

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21st Century Community Learning Centers—Four Counties for Kids

Funded in 2001, this comprehensive community learning center project provides afterschool programming including academic tutoring, recreation and life-skills training, family and adult programming, and a computer lab in four rural counties in western Illinois. It is designed to (a) extend learning beyond the school day, (b) offer alternatives to drug use and violence, (c) coordinate services among local agencies, (d) coordinate programs among school districts, and (e) improve families' access to services and technology.

(Family/Community Involvement, Multi-Component/Comprehensive, Positive Youth Development)

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign Center for Prevention Research and Development. (2003). 4C4K 21st Century Community Learning Center: The second year evaluation report. Champaign, IL: Author.

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign Center for Prevention Research and Development. (2004). 4 Counties for Kids—The implementation of the 21st Century Community Learning Centers program: Final evaluation report. Champaign, IL: Author.

21st Century Community Learning Centers—Houston, San Antonio, and Ben Wheeler, Texas

The program, implemented in three Texas districts in 1998, is designed to address the community's educational needs after school, on weekends, and during summers. Each program aims to provide school-linked services to build individual skills and local opportunities.

(Family/Community Involvement, Multi-Component/Comprehensive, Tutoring/Extra Instruction)

Reyna, R. A. (2001). The effects of the 21st Century Community Learning Centers on parental involvement and student classroom performance as perceived by K–8 teachers and parents in first cycle funded projects in selected Texas public schools (Unpublished doctoral dissertation). Texas A&M University, College Station.

21st Century Community Learning Centers—Idaho

This program in Idaho is designed to provide academic enrichment opportunities, art, music, recreation, sports, drug and violence prevention, and youth development activities to students during non-school hours. The program also offers opportunities for educational development to families of students served by community learning centers.

(Academic/Enrichment, Family/Community Involvement, Multi-Component/Comprehensive)

Idaho State Department of Education. (2011). 21st Century Community Learning Centers Program, 2009–2010 final report. Boise: Author. www.sde.idaho.gov/site/cclc/cclc_docs/2009-10%20ID%20Final%20Report.pdf

21st Century Community Learning Centers—L.A. Cops

Begun in 1999–2000, this initiative was formed to address the need for meaningful afterschool programming serving at-risk high school youth in Los Angeles.

(Academic/Enrichment, Family/Community Involvement, Multi-Component/Comprehensive)

Butler, M., Marx, P. Jesse, G., & Villanueva, V. (2002). LA COPS 21st Century Community Learning Centers Program: Evaluation of after-school program implementation, 2001–2002. Pasadena, CA: Public Works.

Butler, M., Jesse, G., & Villanueva, V. (2003). LA COPS 21st Century Community Learning Centers Program: Evaluation of after-school program implementation, 2002–2003. Pasadena, CA: Public Works.

21st Century Community Learning Centers—Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Begun in 1998, these centers use neighborhood schools and facilities to provide a wide variety of programs and services to local children, families, and residents in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The centers aim to help children become high academic achievers, provide opportunities for adult lifelong learning, and help the community create safe and viable neighborhoods.

(Academic/Enrichment, Family/Community Involvement, Multi-Component/Comprehensive)

The School/Community Integrated Services Network Evaluation Committee. (2001). A report to the Milwaukee community 21st Century Community Learning Centers. Milwaukee, WI: Author.

The School/Community Integrated Services Network Evaluation Committee. (2002). Milwaukee Public Schools 21st Century Community Learning Centers 2001–02: A report to the community. Milwaukee, WI: Author.

21st Century Community Learning Centers—Orleans Southwest Supervisory Union, Vermont

Begun in 2001 in Orleans County, Vermont, these centers are designed to improve the academic and social well-being of area residents through expanded and integrated education, health, safety, social services, cultural, and recreation program opportunities for youth and adults. Centers provide summer programs, afterschool programs, evening programs, and family-oriented cultural and recreational programs.

(Family/Community Involvement, Multi-Component/Comprehensive, Positive Youth Development)

Teran, G. A., & Koliba, C. (2002). Creating learning communities: 21st Century Community Learning Centers first year evaluation report, Orleans Southwest Supervisory Union. Burlington: University of Vermont, College of Education and Social Services, John Dewey Project on Progressive Education.

21st Century Community Learning Centers—Pathways to Progress

Funded in 2000–2003, these community learning centers in elementary and middle schools provided coordinated expanded-day and expanded-year community-learning activities for students, families, and community members in St. Paul, Minnesota. The goals were to increase student academic achievement, reduce drug use and violence among youth, and increase parental capacity to support their children’s education.

(Academic/Enrichment, Family/Community Involvement, Multi-Component/Comprehensive)

Wahlstrom, K., Sheldon, T., Anderson, R., & Zorka, H. (2001). Annual evaluation report: 21st Century Community Learning Centers Pathways to Progress Project, Saint Paul public schools. St. Paul: University of Minnesota, Center for Applied Research and Educational Improvement.

Wahlstrom, K., Sheldon, T., & Lewis, A. (2004). Final evaluation report: 21st Century Community Learning Centers Pathways to Progress, Saint Paul Public Schools. St. Paul: University of Minnesota, Center for Applied Research and Educational Improvement. http://cehd.umn.edu/CAREI/Reports/docs/PathwaysFinalEvalReport-2004.pdf

 

21st Century Community Learning Centers—South Carolina

This program in South Carolina provides academic, artistic, and cultural enrichment opportunities to students and their families when school is not in session.

(Academic/Enrichment, Family/Community Involvement, Multi-Component/Comprehensive)

System Wide Solutions, Inc. (2007). The 2006–2007 evaluation of the South Carolina 21st Century Community Learning Center Program Volume I: Federal objectives and evaluation requirements. Columbia, SC: Author.

Appenzeller, G. W., Nelson, M., Meadows, S., & Powell, T. (2008). The 2006–2007 evaluation of the South Carolina 21st Century Community Learning Center Program Volume II: Identification of best practices. Columbia, SC: System Wide Solutions, Inc. 

System Wide Solutions, Inc. (2009). The 2007–2008 evaluation of the South Carolina 21st Century Community Learning Center Program Volume I: Federal objectives and evaluation requirements. Columbia, SC: Author.

Appenzeller, G. W., Nelson, M., Meadows, S., & Powell, T. (2009). The 2007–2008 evaluation of the South Carolina 21st Century Community Learning Center Program Volume IV: An examination of differences In outcomes among South Carolina 21st CCLC service provision organizations. Columbia, SC: System Wide Solutions, Inc.

www.swsolutionsinc.com/education.html

System Wide Solutions, Inc. (2010). The 2008–2009 evaluation of the South Carolina 21st Century Community Learning Center Program. Columbia, SC: Author. http://www.swsolutionsinc.com/reports/edu/2008-200921stCCLCEvaluationReport-Final031510.pdf
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21st Century Community Learning Centers—Texas

First funded in 2003, these programs throughout the state of Texas are designed to (a) provide opportunities for academic enrichment, (b) offer students a wide variety of additional services, programs, and activities, and (c) offer families opportunities for literacy and related educational development.

(Academic/Enrichment, Family/Community Involvement, Multi-Component/Comprehensive)

Texas Education Agency. (2004). 21st Century Community Learning Centers: Evaluation of projects funded for the 2003–04 school year. Austin, TX: Author.

Dodson, M., & McCann, E. (2006). The evaluation of Texas 21st Century Community Learning Center projects: Case study report. Austin, TX: Southwest Educational Development Laboratory Evaluation Services.

Dodson, M., & McCann, E. (2006). The evaluation of Texas 21st Century Community Learning Center projects: Common features of promising afterschool programs in Texas. Austin, TX: Southwest Educational Development Laboratory Evaluation Services.

Moellmer, A., Rapaport, A., Adachi, E. & Sievert, J. (2007). 21st Century Community Learning Centers: Evaluation of projects funded during the 2004–2005 school year. Austin: Texas Education Agency.

Farris, J., Nunnery, J. A., Ross, S. M., & Zoblotsky, T. A. (2008). Texas 21st Century Community Learning Centers: Annual report 2006–07. Naperville, IL: Learning Points Associates.

Burgette, J., Zoblotsky, T., Neergaard, L., Akerstrom, J., Gibbs, C., Naftzger, N., Vinson, M., & Nunnery, J. (2009). Texas 21st Century Community Learning Centers evaluation 2007–2008. Memphis, TN: Center for Research in Educational Policy. ritter.tea.state.tx.us/opge/progeval/OutOfSchoolLearning/21CCLS_Final_0809.pdf

21st Century Community Learning Centers—Virginia

This program in Virginia provides opportunities outside of the regular school day for academic enrichment to help students meet state and local performance standards in core academic subjects.

(Academic/Enrichment, Family/Community Involvement)

Faris, J., Hilgeman, M., Huang, Y., & Zoblotsky, T. (2008). Virginia Department of Education evaluation of 21st Century Community Learning Centers 2006–2007. Memphis, TN: Center for Research in Educational Policy.

Park, H., Layton, E., Zoblotsky, T., & Huang, Y. (2010). Evaluation of 21st Century Community Learning Centers 2008–2009. Memphis, TN: Center for Research in Educational Policy. www.doe.virginia.gov/federal_programs/esea/title4/part_b/evaluations/2007-2008.pdf

Zoblotsky, T., & Huang, Y. (2010). Virginia Department of Education Evaluation of 21st Century Community Learning Centers 2007–2008. Supplemental technical report analysis for Grades 3–8. Memphis, TN: Center for Research in Educational Policy. www.doe.virginia.gov/federal_programs/esea/title4/part_b/evaluations/2007-2008.pdf

Park, H., Zoblotzky, T., Layton, E., & Gallagher, B. (2011). Evaluation of 21st Century Community Learning Centers 2009–2010. Memphis, TN: Center for Research in Educational Policy. www.doe.virginia.gov/federal_programs/esea/title4/part_b/evaluations/2009-2010.pdf

21st Century Community Learning Centers—Wyoming

This program in Wyoming supports community learning centers that provide academic enrichment opportunities during nonschool hours for children, particularly those who attend high-poverty and low-performing schools.

(Academic/Enrichment, Family/Community Involvement)

Drever, A. I., & Jenniges, R. (2008). 21st Century Community Learning Centers: Annual report 2008. Laramie: Wyoming Survey & Analysis Center, University of Wyoming.

After-School Math PLUS (ASM+)

This program, which was piloted in New York, New York, and St. Louis, Missouri, in 2004, uses the field of informal education as a venue for underserved youth in grades 3–8 to develop positive attitudes, build conceptual knowledge, and sharpen skills in math.

(Academic/Enrichment, Family/Community Involvement, Science/Technology/Mathematics)

Academy for Educational Development (2005). After-School Math PLUS (ASM+): First year evaluation report. New York: Author.

Afterschool Programs as an Oasis of Hope for Black Parents in Four Cities

This study, conducted in 2006–2007, examines the opinions of low-income and working-class Black parents regarding the quality and importance of public school- and community-based after school programs. Data were collected from three cities: Detroit, Milwaukee, Washington, DC, and Philadelphia.

(Family/Community Involvement, Research Studies)

Robinson, G., & Fenwick, L. (2007). Afterschool programs as an oasis of hope for black parents in four cities. Washington, DC: The Black Alliance for Educational Options. www.baeo.org/files/mottSummary.pdf
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All-Around-the-Neighborhood

This summer initiative in St. Paul, Minnesota, serves children ranging from age 4 to the early teens, and was designed and implemented as a strategy to strengthen informal learning for children and to build the neighborhood's capacity to support such learning.

(Academic/Enrichment, Family/Community Involvement, System-Building)

Kari, N. (with Skold, E., & Denissen, K.). (2004). Preliminary evaluation findings: All-Around-the-Neighborhood summer camps. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs, Center for Democracy and Citizenship.

American Indian Math Project

Initiated in 2007 at a school in Minneapolis, Minnesota, this project aims to increase the math scores, school connectedness, and capacity to become productive adults of American Indian students in grades 5–10 through culturally relevant after school and family activities.

(Culture/Heritage, Family/Community Involvement, Science/Technology/Mathematics)

Pierce, A., & Gaona, M. (2008). American Indian Math Project: Annual evaluation report. St. Paul, MN: Wilder Research. www.wilder.org/reportsummary.0.html?&no_cache=1&tx_ttnews[pointer]=4&tx_ttnews[tt_news]=2093&tx_ttnews[backPid]=111&cHash=4554ceac20

ARCH (A Real Community Helps) After-School Program

This program provides one-to-one tutoring after school for elementary youth in St. Louis, Missouri, and seeks to connect the children's school and family lives by involving parents in their children's education. Tutors are drawn from university and high school students.

(Family/Community Involvement, Literacy, Tutoring/Extra Instruction)

Leto, D. J. (1995). Creating community with an after-school tutoring program. Language Arts, 72, 128–136.
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Austin Eastside Story After-School Program

Begun in 1996, this program provides a safe and academically enriching environment for children (pre-K to seventh grade) attending school in East and Northeast Austin, Texas.

(Academic/Enrichment, Family/Community Involvement, Positive Youth Development)

Witt, P. A., & Bradberry, E. K. (2000). Evaluation of the Eastside Story After-School Program. Austin, TX: Office of the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts. rptsweb.tamu.edu/Faculty/Witt/conpubs/Eastside.PDF
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Beacon Initiative—San Francisco, California

This initiative, begun in 1994, aims to help youth in San Francisco, California, develop competencies that will help them become responsible adults.

(Family/Community Involvement, Multi-Component/Comprehensive, Positive Youth Development)

Walker, K. E., & Arbreton, A. J. A. (2001). Working together to build Beacon Centers in San Francisco: Evaluation findings from 1998–2000. Philadelphia: Public/Private Ventures. www.ppv.org/ppv/publications/assets/118_publication.pdf

Walker, K. E., & Arbreton, A. J. A. (2004). After-school pursuits: An examination of outcomes in the San Francisco Beacon Initiative. Philadelphia: Public/Private Ventures.www.ppv.org/ppv/publications/assets/168_publication.pdf

Tripp, F. L., Schwartz, J. L., & Bennett, R. W. (2004). San Francisco Beacon Initiative: Individual Beacon profile June 2004 evaluation report. Oakland, CA: Resource Development Associates. www.sfbeacon.org/00_Evaluations/Evaluations/2004_Annual_Evaluation_RDA.pdf

Schwartz, J. L., Reyes, P., Tharp, J., & Bennett, P. M. (2005). San Francisco Beacon Initiative: Second year (2005) evaluation report. Oakland, CA: Resource Development Associates. www.sfbeacon.org/00_Evaluations/Evaluations/2005_Evaluation_RDA.pdf

Moonka, N., Reyes, P., Tharp, J., & Bennett, P. M. (2006). San Francisco Beacon Initiative: Third year (2006) evaluation report. Oakland, CA: Resource Development Associates. www.sfbeacon.org/00_Evaluations/Evaluations/2006_Evaluation_RDA.pdf

Yu, H. C., Lea, C. Leufgen, J, & Rubin, A. (2008). Evaluation of the San Francisco Beacon Initiative: Final report. Oakland, CA: Social Policy Research Associates. www.sfbeacon.org/00_Evaluations/Evaluations/2008_Beacon_Evaluation_Report_SPR_Full_Report.pdf

Baker, A., & Tamanas, E. (2009). Youth Development Institute’s Beacons Young Adolescent Initiative: Evaluation update. Philadelphia: Youth Development Institute, OMG Center for Collaborative Learning. www.sfbeacon.org/00_Evaluations/BYA_Evaluations/2009_BYA%20Evaluation_OMG.pdf

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Beacons Initiative—New York, New York

Begun in 1991, this initiative links community-based and nonprofit organizations with schools to increase supports for youth and families in New York City, New York.

(Family/Community Involvement, Multi-Component/Comprehensive, Positive Youth Development)

Warren, C., Brown, P., & Freudenberg, N. (1999). Evaluation of the New York City Beacons: Summary of phase I findings. New York: Academy for Educational Development.

Warren, C., Feist, M., & Nevarez, N. (2002). A place to grow: Final evaluation of the New York City Beacons, a summary report. New York: Academy for Educational Development. scs.aed.org/publications

Black Teens for Advancement

This school-based program is intended to help African American youth in St. Paul, Minnesota, develop their academic, cultural, political, and social potential through knowledge of their history and exposure to basic positive values.

(Culture/Heritage, Family/Community Involvement, Positive Youth Development)

Stevens, A., & Owen., G. (1998). Black Teens for Advancement (BTA) 1997–1998 evaluation report. St. Paul, MN: Wilder Research Center. www.wilder.org/reportsummary.0.html?&tx_ttnews[pointer]=22&tx_ttnews
[tt_news]=1397&tx_ttnews[backPid]=111&cHash=98f6a93ad2

Boys & Girls Clubs—Family PLUS (Parents Leading, Uniting, Serving) Initiative

Launched in 2006, this national initiative seeks to help Boys & Girls Clubs build relationships with community agencies and other entities that help ensure that families in need have the opportunities, networks, and assistance to realize their children’s aspirations, and to involve parents and caregivers in the planning and implementation of the programming in their children’s Clubs.

(Family/Community Involvement)

Kreider, H., & Raghupathy, S. (2010). Engaging families in Boys & Girls Clubs: An evaluation of the Family PLUS Pilot Initiative. The School Community Journal, 20(2), 9–21 www.adi.org/journal/resources/SCJFall2010.pdf

California 21st Century High School After School Safety and Enrichment for Teens (ASSETs) Program

Initiated in 2003, this program provides incentives for establishing out-of-school time enrichment programs in California that partner schools and communities to provide academic support; safe, constructive alternatives for high school students; and assistance in passing the state high school exit exam. Each program must consist of three elements: academic assistance, educational enrichment, and family literacy services.

(Academic/Enrichment, Family/Community Involvement, Tutoring/Extra Instruction)

Hipps, J., Diaz, M., & Wingren, G. (2006). California 21st Century High School After School Safety and Enrichment for Teens (ASSETs) Program independent evaluation: Interim report. San Francisco: WestEd. www.wested.org/online_pubs/assets_interim_report.pdf

Hipps, J., & Diaz, M. (2007). ASSETs final evaluation report: California 21st Century High School After School Safety and Enrichment for Teens (ASSETs) Program. San Francisco: WestEd. www.wested.org/cs/we/view/rs/840

Child First Authority After-School Program

Begun in 1996, this Baltimore, Maryland, community-wide after school program seeks to improve the quality of life in low-income communities by serving youth and their families academically, culturally, and behaviorally.

(Academic/Enrichment, Culture/Heritage, Family/Community Involvement)

Fashola, O. S. (1999). The Child First Authority After-School Program: A descriptive evaluation. Washington, DC: Center for Research on the Education of Students Placed at Risk, Johns Hopkins University and Howard University. www.csos.jhu.edu/CRESPAR/techReports/Report38.pdf

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Citizen Schools

Begun in 1995, this program operates a national network of apprenticeship programs for middle school students that connects adult volunteers to youth in hands-on afterschool learning projects. The program aims to help youth develop academic and leadership skills needed to succeed in school, get into college, and become leaders in their careers and their communities.

(Academic/Enrichment, Family/Community Involvement, Youth Leadership)

Fabiano, L., Espino, J., & Reisner, E. R. with Pearson, L. M. (2003). Citizen Schools: Using community resources to promote youth development . Phase I report of the Citizen Schools evaluation. Washington, DC: Policy Studies Associates. www.emcf.org/fileadmin/user/PDF/Results/eval_CitizenSchoolsEvaluation2003.pdf

Espino, J., Fabiano, L., & Pearson, L. M. (with Kirkwood, K. P., Afolabi, K., & Pasatta, K.). (2004). Citizen Schools: Evidence from two student cohorts on the use of community resources to promote youth development. Phase II report of the Citizen Schools evaluation. Washington, DC: Policy Studies Associates. 

Fabiano, L., Pearson, L. M., Williams, I. J. (2005). Putting students on a pathway to academic and social success: Phase III findings of the Citizen Schools evaluation. Washington, DC: Policy Studies Associates. www.emcf.org/fileadmin/user/PDF/Results/eval_CitizenSchoolsEvaluation2005.pdf

Fabiano, L., Pearson, L. M., Reisner, E. R., & Williams, I. J. (2006). Preparing students in the middle grades to succeed in high school: Findings from Phase IV of the Citizen Schools Evaluation. Washington, DC: Policy Studies Associates. www.emcf.org/fileadmin/user/PDF/Results/eval_CitizenSchoolsEvaluation2006.pdf

Pearson, L. M., Vile, J. D., & Reisner, E. R. (2008). Establishing a foundation for progress toward high school graduation: Findings from Phase V of the Citizen Schools Evaluation. Washington, DC: Policy Studies Associates. www.aypf.org/documents/ExecutiveSummaryofCitizenSchools2008Evaluation.pdf

Vile, J. D., Arcaira, E., & Reisner, E. R. (2009). Progress toward high school graduation: Citizen Schools’ youth outcomes in Boston. Washington, DC: Policy Studies Associates. www.emcf.org/fileadmin/user/PDF/Results/eval_CitizenSchoolsEvaluation2009.pdf

Arcaira, E., Vile, J. D., & Reisner, E. R. (2010). Achieving high school graduation: Citizen Schools’ youth outcomes in Boston. Washington, DC: Policy Studies Associates.

Creating Family Lasting Connections

Developed in 1988, this program offers evening trainings to teens and their parents in Kentucky church communities to build families’ resilience in order to help decrease and prevent substance abuse.

(Complementary Learning, Family/Community Involvement, Prevention)

Johnson, K., & Strader, T.  (1996). Reducing alcohol and other drug use by strengthening community, family, and youth resiliency:  An evaluation of the Creating Lasting Connections Program. Journal of Adolescent Research, 11(1), 36–67.

Strader, T., Collins, D., Noe, T. & Johnson, K. (1997). Mobilizing church communities for alcohol and other drug abuse prevention through the use of volunteer church advocate teams.  The Journal of Volunteer Administration, 15(2), 27.

Johnson, K., Bryant, D. D., Collins, D. A., Noe, T. D., Strader, T. N., & Berbaum, M. (1998). Preventing and reducing alcohol and other drug use among high-risk youths by increasing family resilience. Social Work, 43(4), 297–308.

Johnson, K., Noe, T., Collins, D., Strader, T. N. & Bucholtz G. (2000). Mobilizing church communities to prevent alcohol and other drug abuse: A model strategy and its evaluation.  Journal of Community Practice. 7(2), 1–27.

Strader, T. N., Noe, T., & Collins, D. (2000) Building healthy individuals, families, and communities: Creating Lasting Connections. Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishing Corporation.

De Colores Community Learning Center

In operation from 2002 to 2004, this after school program served low-performing elementary school Chicano-Latino children in southeastern Los Angeles County, California and provided a self-contained academic program with a strong focus on parent and community involvement.

(Academic/Enrichment, Family/Community Involvement)

Ordoñez-Jasis, R., & Jasis, P. (2004). Rising with De Colores: Tapping into the resources of la Comunidad to assist under-performing Chicano-Latino students. Journal of Latinos and Education, 3, 53–64.

Downtown L.A. School-Based After School Program

Implemented in 1997 in a Los Angeles, California, middle school, this after school program's efforts are directed toward improving academic achievement and developing positive peer relations and communication through collaborative efforts from community agencies. Activities and services include case management, mental health services, tutoring and recreational activities, parenting and computer classes, mentoring, social and communication skills development, community involvement and beautification, and job placement.

(Academic/Enrichment, Family/Community Involvement, Multi-Component/Comprehensive)

Rivera, E. (2001). Effects of a school-based after-school program on academic performance, school behavior, and attendance among low-income minority students. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of California, Santa Cruz.

Early Risers “Skills for Success”

This prevention program aims to alter the developmental trajectory of elementary-age children with early onset aggressive behavior. The program features four core components: a summer school program, a teacher consultation and student mentoring program, child social skills groups, and parent education and skills-training groups, all delivered in tandem with a family support program individually tailored to address families’ needs.

(Complementary Learning, Family/Community Involvement, Prevention)

August, G. J., Realmuto, G. M., Kektner, J. M., & Bloomquist, M. L. (2001). An integrated components preventive intervention for aggressive elementary children: The Early Risers program. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 69(4).

August, G. J., Realmuto, G. M., Winters, K. C., & Hektner, J. M. (2001). Prevention of adolescent drug abuse: Targeting high-risk children with a multifaceted intervention model—The Early Risers “Skills for Success” Program. Applied & Preventive Psychology, 10, 135–154.

August, G. J., Hektner, J. M., Egan, E. A., Realmuto, G. M., & Bloomquist, M. L. (2002). The Early Risers longitudinal prevention trial: Examination of 3-year outcomes in aggressive children with intent-to-treat and as-intended analyses. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 16(Suppl.), S27–S39.

August, G. J., Egan, E. A., Realmuto, G. M., & Hektner, J. M. (2003). Parceling component effects of a multifaceted prevention program for disruptive elementary school children. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 31(5). springerlink.com/content/x2494x66h49p0l22/

August, G. J., Lee, S. S., Bloomquist, M. L.,  Realmuto, G. M., & Hektner, J. M. (2003). Dissemination of an evidence-based prevention innovation for aggressive children living in culturally diverse, urban neighborhoods: The Early Risers effectiveness study. Prevention Science, 4, 271–286.

August, G. J., Egan, E. A., Realmuto, G. M., & Hektner, J. M. (2003). Four years of the Early Risers early-age-targeted preventive intervention: Effects on aggressive children’s peer relations. Behavior Therapy, 34, 453–470.

August, G. J., Lee, S. S., Bloomquist, M. L,  Realmuto, G. M., & Hektner, J. M. (2004). Maintenance effects of an evidence-based prevention innovation for aggressive children living in culturally-diverse urban neighborhoods: The Early Risers effectiveness study. Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders, 12, 194–205.

August, G. J., Bloomquist, M. L,  Lee, S. S., Realmuto, G. M., & Hektner, J. M. (2006). Can evidence-based prevention programs be sustained in community practice settings?  The Early Risers advanced-stage effectiveness trial. Prevention Science, 7, 151–165.

August, G. J., Bloomquist, M. L., Realmuto, G. M., & Hektner, J. M. (2007). The Early Risers “Skills for Success” Program: A targeted intervention for preventing conduct problems and substance abuse in aggressive elementary school children. In P. Tolan, J. Szapocznik, & S. Sambrano (Eds.), Preventing youth substance abuse: Science-based programs for children and adolescents (pp. 137–158). Washington: American Psychological Association.

Bernat, D. H., August G. J., Hektner J. M., &  Bloomquist M. L. (2007). The Early Risers preventive intervention: testing for six-year outcomes and mediational processes. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 35(4), 605–617.

Families and Schools Together® (FAST)

Operating on an international scale (including nationally in the U.S.), this organization helps communities create barriers to the risks youth face by creating a strong family accountability infrastructure. It provides parental involvement and alcohol and drug prevention/intervention programs, as well as multiple programs held after school for pre-k through high school-aged children and youth.

(Complementary Learning, Family/Community Involvement, Prevention)

McDonald, L., & Price, K. (2007). Evaluation report for middle school FAST, Aggregate summary 2002–2007. Madison, WI: FAST National Training & Evaluation Center.
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Family Participation in After-School Study

Conducted 2003–2004, this nationwide study examines programs that provide expanded learning opportunities for youth in a safe, drug-free, and supervised environment.

(Family/Community Involvement, Multi-Component/Comprehensive, Research Studies)

Weiss, A. R., & Brigham, R. A. (2003). The family participation in after-school study. Boston, MA: Institute for Responsive Education.

Strickland, C. S. (with Jean, I.). (2005). Promising Practices that promote family participation in after school programs: Another link to positive educational outcomes. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Institute for Responsive Education.

First Teachers

This after school family involvement program in Washington, D.C., incorporates families telling, writing, and then typing family stories on computers with their elementary school aged children to promote literacy, familiarity with technology, children’s sense of efficacy and self-confidence, and parents' involvement with their child's education.

(Family/Community Involvement, Literacy, Science/Technology/Mathematics)

Samaras, A. P., & Wilson, J. C. (1999). Am I invited? Perspectives of family involvement with technology in inner-city schools. Urban Education, 34, 499–530.
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Girlfriends for KEEPS (Keys to Eating, Exercising, Playing, and Sharing)

This after school intervention is focused on helping 8–10-year-old African American girls in Minnesota increase physical activity and healthy eating in order to help prevent obesity. The intervention also included a family component.

(Family/Community Involvement, Prevention, Sports/Recreation)

Story, M., Sherwood, N. E., Himes, J. H., Davis, M., Jacobs, Jr., D. R., Cartwritght, Y., et al. (2003). An after-school obesity prevention program for African-American girls: The Minnesota GEMS Pilot Study [Supplement 1]. Ethnicity & Disease, 13(1), 54–64.

Girls at the Center

Initiated in 1996, this program pairs girls in economically disadvantaged communities across the country with an adult partner for experiences in science.

(Academic/Enrichment, Family/Community Involvement, Science/Technology/Mathematics)

Abrams, C., Dierking, L., McKelvey, L., & Jones, D. (1998). Year two report: Summative evaluation—Girls at the Center. Annapolis, MD: Institute for Learning Innovation.

Adelman, L., Dierking, L. D., & Adams, M. (2000). Summative evaluation year 4: Findings for Girls at the Center (Tech. Rep.). Annapolis, MD: Institute for Learning Innovation.

Girlstart

Founded in 1997 in Austin, Texas, this organization aims to empower girls to excel in math, science, and technology. It offers a variety of educational formats designed for girls, adults, and families through afterschool programs, workshop series, summer camps, and community events.

(Complementary Learning, Family/Community Involvement, Science/Technology/Mathematics)

Stacy, C. (2006). Aiming for Algebra: Moving middle school Girls through the STEM gateway. Final evaluation report. Austin, TX: Girlstart.

Stacy, C. (2009). National Science Foundation Grant: Project It Girl 2008–09 annual report (Year 3). Austin, TX: Girlstart.

Higher Achievement Program

Founded in 1975, this afterschool and summer academic program gives middle school-aged youth from at-risk communities an opportunity to succeed in school and in life. The program focuses on three key areas: academics, social skills, and leadership. It operates through achievement centers in Washington, DC; Alexandria and Richmond, Virginia; and Baltimore, Maryland.

(Academic/Enrichment, Family/Community Involvement, Service-Learning/Civic Engagement)

Herrera, C., Linden, L. L., Arbreton, A., & Grossman, J. B. (2011). Summer snapshot: Exploring the impact of Higher Achievement’s year-round out-of-school-time program on summer learning. Philadelphia: Public/Private Ventures. www.ppv.org/ppv/publications/assets/334_publication.pdf

Herrera, C., Linden, L. L., Arbreton, A., & Grossman, J. B. (2011). Testing the impact of Higher Achievement’s year-round out-of-school-time program on academic outcomes. Philadelphia: Public/Private Ventures. www.ppv.org/ppv/publications/assets/332_publication.pdf

Hip Hop to Health

This after school program in Chicago, Illinois, provides inner-city African American children with programming in culture-specific cardiovascular disease risk reduction and includes parental involvement, peer leaders, professionally trained teaching staff, role models, and community support.

(Culture/Heritage, Family/Community Involvement, Health)

Stolley, M. R. (1997). Developing an effective cardiovascular risk reduction program for inner-city African-American youth: “Hip Hop to Health.” Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL.

Institute for Student Achievement COMET and STAR Programs

In use and under development since 1990, these programs enable low-performing middle and high school students to succeed in school. They integrate academic enrichment, counseling, personal development and parental involvement, and extend the traditional school day and school year in schools in Massachusetts, New York, and Virginia.

(Academic/Enrichment, Family/Community Involvement, Positive Youth Development)

Ben-Avie, M., Haynes, N. M., Steinfeld, T. R., Pitterson, S., Beetsma, D., & Weinzimmer, D. P. (1999). Intervening in the lives of students placed at risk: An independent evaluation of the Institute for Student Achievement COMET & STAR Programs, school-based academic enrichment and counseling intervention. Lake Success, NY: Institute for Student Achievement.

Lighthouses in the Community

This project provides at-risk elementary and middle school youth in Bridgeport, Connecticut, with educational, cultural, and recreational opportunities through community and school partnerships. Students benefit from a safe and supportive environment after school, during the summer, and through “Saturday Academies.”

(Academic/Enrichment, Family/Community Involvement, Multi-Component/Comprehensive)

Zarlengo, P. (2002). Executive summary: Lighthouse program for 2001–2002 evaluation. Bridgeport, CT: Lighthouse Program.

MAAT Adolescent and Family Rites of Passage Program

This program uses a multifaceted Afrocentric approach to promoting resiliency in at-risk African American 11.5–14.5-year-olds in Washington, D.C. The program consists of three interventions: an after school component, family enhancement and empowerment activities, and individual and family counseling.

(Culture/Heritage, Family/Community Involvement, Positive Youth Development)

Harvey, A. R., & Hill, R. B. (2004). Africentric youth and family rites of passage program: Promoting resilience among at-risk African American youths. Social Work, 49(1), 65–74.

Migrant Educational Technology Program

This after school program in Detroit, Michigan, teaches Latino migrant families basic computing and educational software applications to help them support their children's schoolwork more effectively.

(Digital Media and Learning, Family/Community Involvement, Science/Technology/Mathematics)

Carrillo, R. (2004). Making connections: Building family literacy through technology. In Scholars in the field: Challenges in migrant education, Cinthia Salinas & María E. Fránquiz (Eds.). Charleston, WV: ERIC Clearinghouse on Rural Education and Small Schools.

New Jersey School-Based Youth Services Program

Implemented in 1988, this program provides social services to students in New Jersey schools. Programs operate before, during, and after school and during the summer and include individual and family counseling, substance abuse counseling, primary and preventative health services, and employment counseling, as well as recreation services.

(Family/Community Involvement, Positive Youth Development, System-Building)

Warren, C., & Fancsali, C. (2000). New Jersey School-Based Youth Services Program: Final report. New York: Academy for Educational Development.
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New York City Department of Youth and Community Development's Out-of-School Time Programs for Youth Initiative

Begun in 2005, this out-of-school time initiative provides funds to support OST programs across New York City. This initiative is designed to address a broad range of developmental objectives for youth and to serve the needs of New York City’s families and communities.

(Academic/Enrichment, Family/Community Involvement, Positive Youth Development)

Russell, C. A., Reisner, E. R., Pearson, L. M., Afolabi, K. P., Miller, T. D., & Mielke, M. B. (2006). Evaluation of DYCD’s Out-of-School Time Initiative: Report on the first year. Washington, DC: Policy Studies Associates, Inc.

Pearson, L. M., Russell, C. A., & Reisner, E. R. (2007). Evaluation of OST programs for youth: Patterns of youth retention in OST programs, 2005–06 to 2006–07. Washington, DC: Policy Studies Associates, Inc. www.policystudies.com/_policystudies.com/files/Year_2_Report.pdf

Russell, C. A., Mielke, M. B., & Reisner, E. R. (2008). Evaluation of the New York City Department of Youth and Community Development Out-of-School Time Programs for Youth Initiative: Results of efforts to increase program quality and scale in year 2. Washington, DC: Policy Studies Associates, Inc. www.nyc.gov/html/dycd/downloads/pdf/ost_evaluation_year_2%20_report.pdf

Russell, C. A., Vile, J. D., Reisner, E. R., Simko, C., Mielke, M. B., & Pechman, E. (2008). Evaluation of the New York City Department of Youth and Community Development Out-of-School Time Programs for Youth Initiative: Implementation of programs for high school youth. Washington, DC: Policy Studies Associates, Inc.

Russell, C. A., Mielke, M. B., & Reisner, E. R. (2009). Evidence of program quality and youth outcomes in the DYCD out-of-school time initiative: Report on the initiative’s first three years. Washington, DC: Policy Studies Associates, Inc. www.wallacefoundation.org/KnowledgeCenter/KnowledgeTopics/CurrentAreasofFocus/Out-Of-SchoolLearning/Pages/evidence-of-program-quality-and-youth-outcomes.aspx

Oakwood Family Education Center

This community-based education center uses the core principles of liberation theology as the change strategy to attempt to improve the educational performance and achievement of Hispanic students through community involvement and empowerment.

(Academic/Enrichment, Faith-Based, Family/Community Involvement)

Aspiazu, G. G., Bauer, S. C., & Spillett, M. D. (1998). Improving the academic performance of Hispanic youth: A community education model. Bilingual Research Journal, 22(2, 3, & 4).

Project Outreach

This community-based after school program for elementary school students in Berlin, Maryland, brings the school, community churches, and parents together as a support network for children. Participating children receive help with homework and lessons in reading, math, or language arts.

(Family/Community Involvement, Tutoring/Extra Instruction)

Kerbin, D. L. (2000). The Project Outreach extended-day program: A formative evaluation of implementation. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Wilmington College, New Castle, DE.

Project Youth Connect

This mentoring program for Hmong youth ages 9–12 and their parents in the Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota, area aims to delay or reduce the use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs by improving school bonding and academic performance, family bonding and functioning, and life management skills.

(Culture/Heritage, Family/Community Involvement, Prevention)

Chase, R., & McLain, L. (2002). Project Youth Connect: Evaluation summary. St. Paul, MN: Wilder Research Center.

Promising Readers Program

This after school tutoring and reading assistance program for struggling K–3 students at a rural elementary school in Mississippi is a literature-based program that engages children in frequent reading and writing, small group skill and strategy instruction, and one-on-one reading.

(Family/Community Involvement, Literacy, Tutoring/Extra Instruction)

Brenner, D., Jayroe, T., & Boutwell, A. (2002). Working with families in the rural south: Findings from the REA funded Promising Readers Program. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Family Research Project. www.hfrp.org/publications-resources/publications-series/family-involvement-research-digests/working-with-families-in-the-rural-south-findings-from-the-rea-funded-promising-readers-program

Safe & Sound Initiative—Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Begun in 1998, this anti-crime initiative provides services before and after school in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

(Family/Community Involvement, Positive Youth Development, Prevention)

Palazzari, T. A., Zevitz, R. G., Santimauro, M. J., & Frinzi, J. N. (2000). HIDTA and Safe & Sound interim evaluation. Milwaukee, WI: Marquette University.

Jones, R. S., Frinzi, J. N., Jawad, M., Tschanz, C. M., & Viola, M. E. (2001). HIDTA and Safe & Sound year 2 evaluation. Milwaukee, WI: Marquette University.

Jones, R. S., Oldknow-Blumentritt, L., Frinzi, J. N., Stichman, A. J., Farkas, M. A.,  & Archbold, C. (2002). HIDTA and Safe & Sound Initiative: Final report. Milwaukee, WI: Marquette University.

Percy, S. L., Davis, S., Batson, T., & Johnson, T. (2008). Evaluation of the Safe & Sound Initiative in Milwaukee. University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee.

Salsa, Sabor y Salud

This healthy lifestyles educational program designed for Latino families has been adapted for use in after school programs. Three after school programs, one in Los Angeles, California and two in Chicago, Illinois, piloted this program.

(Family/Community Involvement, Health, Sports/Recreation)

Huang, D., La Torre, D., Oh, C., Harven, A., Huber, L., Leon, S., & Mostafavi. S. (2008). The afterschool experience in Salsa, Sabor y Salud: Evaluation 2007-08. CRESST Report 747. National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing (CRESST)/University of California, Los Angeles. www.cse.ucla.edu/products/reports/R747.pdf

Santa Barbara Community Prevention Coalition After School Program

This program for students transitioning to junior high school in Santa Barbara, California, combines academic tutoring, teaching of specific skills (e.g., problem solving, respect for others), and a parent education component that teaches parents specific skills to better support their children in home and school environments.

(Family/Community Involvement, Prevention, Tutoring/Extra Instruction)

Morrison, G. M., Storino, M. H., Robertson, L. M., Weissglass, T., & Dondero, A. (2000). The protective function of after-school programming and parent education and support for students at risk for substance abuse. Evaluation and Program Planning, 23(3), 365–371.
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Save the Children Web of Support Initiative

Begun in 1997, this national initiative enhances the quality out-of-school time programs for children ages 5 to 18 by focusing on three desired outcomes: constructive activities, caring adults, and safe places.

(Family/Community Involvement, System-Building, Youth Leadership)

Terao, K. L., Morell, L. C., Stevenson, C. L., & Sloane, K. J. (1999). 1997–98 Web of Support Initiative wide evaluation. Annual report. San Mateo, CA: The Aguirre Group.

Terao, K. L., Morell, L., & Stevenson, C. (2000). 1998–99 Web of Support Initiative wide evaluation. Annual report. San Mateo, CA: The Aguirre Group.

Terao, K. L., Morell, L., & Stevenson, C. (2001). 1999–2000 Web of Support Initiative wide evaluation. Annual report. San Mateo, CA: The Aguirre Group.

Terao, K. L., Morell, L., Stevenson, C., & Moulton, J. (2002). 2000–2001 Web of Support Initiative wide evaluation. Annual report. San Mateo, CA: The Aguirre Group.
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Schools Uniting Neighborhoods Initiative

Begun in 1999, this initiative’s mission is to improve the lives of children, their families, and the community through partnering with local school communities in the City of Portland and Multnomah County in Oregon, to extend the school day and develop schools as “community centers” in their neighborhoods.

(Family/Community Involvement, Multi-Component/Comprehensive)

The Sun Evaluation Workgroup. (2001). Schools Uniting Neighborhoods Initiative: Baseline report. Portland, OR: Author. www.co.multnomah.or.us/oscp/sunschools/pdf/baseline_eval_rep.pdf

Nave, G., Woo, A., & Kruger, R. (2006). Multnomah County Department of School and Community Partnerships SUN service system: 2004–05 evaluation report. Portland, OR: Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory. www2.co.multnomah.or.us/Public/EntryPoint?ct=736db699a37e1110VgnVCM1000003bc614acRCRD
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Somali Community Services of Seattle Child Development Program

Established in 1998, this program is designed to meet the needs of Somali children and families in Seattle in transitioning to the U.S. educational system. The program provides tutoring through after school study sessions and also provides parents with knowledge regarding how to use school-based resources and other information for parents to transition successfully to their new community. 

(Family/Community Involvement, Tutoring/Extra Instruction, Youth Leadership)

Casey, B., Sullivan, M., & Roble, M. A. (2000). Evaluation report: Somali Community Services of Seattle Child Development Program. Seattle, WA: Seattle Partners for Healthy Communities.

Texas After School Initiative for Middle Schools

In 1999 this initiative was started to serve students ages 10 to 14 at risk of academic failure or juvenile delinquency in Texas. The goals are to increase participants' academic achievement, reduce referrals to the juvenile justice system, and increase involvement of parents or mentors.

(Academic/Enrichment, Family/Community Involvement, Prevention)

Texas Education Agency. (2002). Executive summary of the first evaluation for the Texas After-School Initiative for Middle Schools (TASIMS) Program. Austin, TX: Author.

Texas Center for Educational Research. (2002). At-risk students and the transition to high school: Texas’ efforts to support ninth grade success. Austin, TX: Author. www.tcer.org/research/txssar/index.aspx

Shapely, K., Vicknair, K., Sheehan, D., Pieper, A., Jepson, D., & Sturges, K. (2004). Texas study of students at risk: Efficacy of grants supporting academic success from elementary through high school. Austin, TX: Texas Center for Educational Research. www.tcer.org/research/txssar/index.aspx
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Transition to Success Pilot Project

Implemented in 2001, this pilot project aimed to strengthen the academic and social development of at-risk youth in Boston, Massachusetts through the provision of after school enrichment programming and targeted family outreach to students. These students were already receiving intensive remedial tutoring through a Boston Public Schools program after doing poorly on the state's standardized tests.

(Academic/Enrichment, Family/Community Involvement, Tutoring/Extra Instruction)

Massachusetts 2020. (2004). Research report: The Transition to Success Pilot Project. Boston, MA: Author.

Youth Leadership Academy

Conducted in 2009 and 2010, this 2-day academy provided youth and adults from communities across Minnesota an opportunity to interact and share information about environmental strategy projects that they had undertaken.

(Family/Community Involvement, Prevention, Youth Leadership)

Rausch, E. J., & Idzelis, M. (2009). ATOD Youth Leadership Academy: May 2009 Summary of evaluation results. Saint Paul, MN: Wilder Research. www.wilder.org/download.0.html?report=2172

Idzelis, M. (2010). Summary of the Advanced Youth Leadership Training results August 2009. Saint Paul, MN: Wilder Research. www.wilder.org/download.0.html?report=2272

Dillon, K., & Idzelis, M. (2010). ATOD Youth Leadership Academy II: January 2010 Summary of evaluation results. Saint Paul, MN: Wilder Research. www.wilder.org/download.0.html?report=2287

Youth Opportunities Unlimited—University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension

This national program was implemented in 1991 in Manchester, New Hampshire. It strives to (a) provide a safe, enriching, and educational after school and vacation environment for school-age children from high-risk neighborhoods; (b) provide opportunities, support, and education to help youth and parents develop basic life skills, strengthen family relationships, and contribute positively to the community; and (c) expand collaborative community-wide efforts to meet the changing needs of school-age children and their families.

(Academic/Enrichment, Family/Community Involvement, Positive Youth Development)

Gregory, P. J. (1996). Youth Opportunities Unlimited: Improving outcomes for youth through after school care. Durham: University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension.

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Published by Harvard Family Research Project