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These three site-based profiles provide a snapshot of school–community partnerships in action and illustrate how diverse programs and models take advantage of these five core strategies to effectively build and sustain partnerships for learning.  Each profile highlights certain aspects of how the partnerships have been applied in the day-to-day lives of schools and community-based programs.  The profiles present three different approaches to partnerships for learning strategies, reflecting the diverse shapes of such partnerships in the field today.  The partnerships profiled are

  • Citizen Schools at Bedichek Middle School, Austin, TX: An integrated partnership between a school-based afterschool program and the middle school that hosts it.
  • After-School All-Stars at August Boeger Middle School, San Jose, CA: A partnership in which the school and afterschool program complement each other’s strengths to achieve common goals.
  • KIPP (Knowledge is Power Program) SHINE Prep elementary school, Houston, TX: A partnership between a charter elementary school and community-based organizations to support learning during the school day and beyond.    

While each of these partnerships operates from a unique philosophy and model, the strategies and lessons are applicable to a wide range of sites and types of learning partnerships.  Two of the three profiles focus on school–afterschool partnerships for learning, and one focuses on school partnerships with community institutions.  We encourage readers to think about applying the lessons learned from all of these approaches to other models, including school-based partnerships with programs and organizations providing health, social service, and other diverse family and student supports.

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© 2014 Presidents and Fellows of Harvard College
Published by Harvard Family Research Project