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Building Villages to Raise Our Children: Six Volume Set

This set of six volumes offers practical advice for establishing and managing a family support program.

Harvard Family Research Project (1993) Research Report

Hard copy out of stock.

Family Involvement in Elementary School Children's Education

This research brief synthesizes the latest research that demonstrates how family involvement contributes to elementary-school-age children's learning and development. The brief summarizes the latest evidence base on effective involvement—specifically, the research studies that link family involvement during the elementary school years to outcomes and programs that have been evaluated to show what works.

Margaret Caspe , M. Elena Lopez, Cassandra Wolos (Winter 2006/2007) Research Report

Free. 12 Pages. [FIMD2].

Lessons From Family-Strengthening Interventions: Learning From Evidence-Based Practice

Examine how effective family-strengthening interventions can positively impact families and children in this practitioner-friendly brief from Harvard Family Research Project. Lessons From Family-Strengthening Interventions: Learning From Evidence-Based Practice is based on our review of interventions that have been rigorously evaluated through experimental and quasi-experimental studies. We offer educators, service providers, and evaluators recommendations for creating successful programs and evaluations.

Margaret Caspe , M. Elena Lopez (October 2006) Research Report

Free. Available online only.

Building and Evaluating Out-of-School Time Connections

This double issue of The Evaluation Exchange focuses on creating and evaluating connections between out-of-school time (OST) programs and the other settings in which children and youth live, learn, and play.

Evaluation Exchange Issue

Free. 40 Pages. [EEXII-1-2].

Challenges and Opportunities in Moving Family Involvement Research Into Practice (Presentation)

This presentation by HFRP staff was part of a conference entitled “Family–School Relations During Adolescence: Linking Interdisciplinary Research and Practice.” The conference was held July 20–21 and was hosted by the Sanford Institute of Public Policy at Duke University, sponsored by the American Psychological Association. The goal of the conference was to establish better links among research, practice, and policy related to family educational involvement during adolescence, particularly for families from ethnically and socioeconomically diverse backgrounds.

Harvard Family Research Project (July 20, 2006) Conferences and Presentations

Free. Available online only.

Family Involvement in Early Childhood Education

This research brief synthesizes the latest research that demonstrates how family involvement contributes to young children's learning and development. The brief summarizes the latest evidence base on effective involvement—specifically, the research studies that link family involvement in early childhood to outcomes and programs that have been evaluated to show what works.

Heather B. Weiss , Margaret Caspe and M. Elena Lopez (Spring 2006) Research Report

Free. 8 Pages. [FIMD1].

After School for Cindy: Family, School, and Community Roles in Out-of-School Time Teaching Case

Second grade teacher Nikki believes that participation in a formal after school program would help her student Cindy academically at school. However, Cindy's single working mother Marla prefers to keep Cindy with her in the afternoons after her numerous struggles with securing quality affordable care in the community. What are the roles of family, school, and community in promoting children's learning and development in out-of-school time?

Ellen Mayer (2005) Teaching Case

Free. Available online only.

Complementary Learning

The topic of this issue of The Evaluation Exchange is complementary learning. Complementary learning posits that we can bolster children's learning and achievement by linking and aligning both the school and nonschool arenas in which children live, learn, and play. This means, for example, linking schools with early childhood programs, out-of-school time programs, and other programs based in the community. In this issue we delve into the kinds of mechanisms that can create these linkages and sustain their effectiveness, and highlight promising approaches for evaluating the complementary-learning practices that already exist, both in terms of what outcomes to focus on and what methodologies to use.

Evaluation Exchange Issue

Free. 25 Pages. [EEXI-1].

Intermediary Organizations as Capacity Builders in Family Educational Involvement

Article in Urban Education, 40(1), 78–105.
In this article the authors argue that intermediary organizations play a crucial role in capacity building for family involvement, by providing alternatives to school-centered approaches to family involvement and engaging families with intensive support that schools seldom offer.

M. Elena Lopez , Holly Kreider, Julia Coffman (2005) Research Report

Finding the Right Hook: Strategies for Attracting and Sustaining Participation in After-School Programs

This article offers promising recruitment and retention strategies to school administrators seeking to boost participation rates in their school-based after school programs.

Sherri Lauver , Priscilla M. D. Little (May 2005) Research Report

Conjoint Behavioral Consultation: A Model to Facilitate Meaningful Partnerships for Families and Schools

Researchers at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln studied the effectiveness of a behavioral intervention model where parents, educators, and service providers work collaboratively to address children's developmental needs in a Head Start program.

Susan M. Sheridan , Brandy L. Clarke, Diane C. Marti, Jennifer D. Burt, Ashley M. Rohlk (April 2005) Research Report

Free. Available online only.

Reading, Writing, and Reform in the Bronx: Lessons for Community Engagement in Schools

Five community-based education organizing groups use various strategies to build trust and commitment among parents and teachers.

Celina Su (January 2005) Research Report

Free. Available online only.

Helping Every Student Succeed: Schools and Communities Working Together

This four-session discussion guide by the Everyday Democracy (formerly the Study Circles Resource Center)is intended for communities trying to close the achievement gap in their schools.

Everyday Democracy (formerly the Study Circles Resource Center) (2005) Tool for Practice

Free. Available online only.

Family, School, and Community Connections Symposium: New Directions for Research, Practice, and Evaluation

We teamed up with the National Center for Family and Community Connections with Schools at the Southwest Educational Development Laboratory (SEDL) to present this 1-day Family, School, and Community Connections Symposium: New Directions for Research, Practice, and Evaluation.

Cathy Jordan , Mary Grassa O'Neill, Heather Weiss (December 2, 2004) Conferences and Presentations

Free. Available online only.

Leveraging Resources to Promote Positive School-CBO Relationships

This article in the Spring 2004 edition of Afterschool Matters (pp. 15–23) uses information in our Out-of-School Time Program Research and Evaluation Database to examine how community-based organizations and schools can work together to build and leverage resources in creating successful after school programming.

Christopher Wimer , Margaret Post, Priscilla M. D. Little (Spring 2004) Research Report

Social Capital

This issue of the FINE Forum features some examples families, schools, and communities coming together to enrich children's learning and social development opportunities.

Harvard Family Research Project (Spring 2004) Research Report

Free. Available online only.

Making Family and Community Connections

This workshop is part of the Concept to Classroom series of multimedia workshops for teacher professional development. In this workshop, Heather Weiss and Joyce Epstein provide expert insights on creating partnerships among schools, parents, and members of the local community.

Heather Weiss , Joyce Epstein (2004) Tool for Practice

Bridging Multiple Worlds: Building Pathways From Childhood to College

Students' pathways through school can be seen as moving through an academic pipeline to adulthood. The Bridging Multiple Worlds model focuses on how diverse youth, beginning in their middle childhood years, navigate across their worlds of families, peers, schools, and communities as they move along their pathways to college, careers, and family roles in adulthood.

Catherine R. Cooper , Gabriela Chavira, Dawn Mikolyski, Dolores Mena, Elizabeth Dom (January 2004) Research Report

Free. Available online only.

Faith-Based Organizing for School Improvement in the Texas Borderlands: A Case Study of the Alliance School Initiative

At two public schools in the Texas borderlands, a faith-based organization and a school–community partnership come together to improve parental engagement.

Timothy Quezada (October 2003) Research Report

Free. Available online only.

School Community Leadership

This course will address the identification and utilization of community resources and the creation of family engagement partnerships, community linkages, and collaborative efforts to provide for the educational, cultural, health, lifelong learning, vocational, and out-of-school needs of students and citizens in a community.

Larry Decker (Spring 2002) Syllabus

Free. Available online only.

Resolving Issues at Johnson Elementary School

The director of a Parent Resource Center is concerned to hear that a number of parents are boycotting the program because they think the parent coordinator used her school connections to place her son in a gifted science class. How can the director and principal ease the tension?

Sylvia Sensiper (2000) Teaching Case

Free. Available online only.

Eight Themes in Comprehensive Community Development: An Annotated Bibliography

This review of current literature on community development is a resource for people hoping to gain insight into the common ground and potential for collaboration that exist between family support and community development initiatives. A brief introduction to the bibliography explains what the eight themes are, why they are important, and what special challenges are raised for community development practitioners.

Louisa Lund (1998) Research Report

$7.00 . 28 Pages. [THEMES].

Home/School/Community Partnerships

Class sessions address system-level issues in working with children and their families. Attention is given to strategies and tactics used by school districts, community groups, and private sector organizations to support academic, health, and social goals for children and their families.

Stewart Ehly (Spring 1998) Syllabus

Free. Available online only.

Challenges in Evaluating Comprehensive School-Linked Services: Toward a More Comprehensive Evaluation Framework

Presented at the 1995 annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, this paper discusses the evaluation challenges facing complex school-linked services and describes and assesses how 18 such initiatives have been evaluated. Includes detailed charts and tables.

Kathleen Shaw , Elaine Replogle (1996) Research Report

$10.00 . 40 Pages. [WP-4].

Head Start as a Family Support Program: Renewing a Community Ethic

This report discusses the efforts of six Head Start programs to address the challenges and goals raised in the 1993 report, Creating a 21st Century Head Start. It assesses their progress in several key areas: expanding enrollment, strengthening parent involvement, addressing issues such as homelessness and substance abuse, improving staff training, bridging research and practice, and collaborating with schools and social service agencies, and addressing issues such as homelessness and substance abuse.

Elaine M. Replogle (1995) Research Report

$8.00 . 92 Pages. [FS-1].

© 2014 Presidents and Fellows of Harvard College
Published by Harvard Family Research Project